PUSH

Push Up Something Hidden

Category: Past Projects (page 1 of 2)

16 ELECTRAS

PREMIERED AT SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL ARTS FESTIVAL, BLACK POINT BATTERY, FORT MASON, SAN FRANCISCO, CA (2017)

CHOREOGRAPHY:
Amy Lewis
MUSIC:
Agnes Szelag
LYRICS:
Compiled by Amy Lewis from sixteen versions of the Electra myth (see references
below)
DANCERS:
Amelia Bonvento, Katherine House, Joyce Lien Kushner, Mary Katherine
Patterson, Daphne Zneimer

Photo: Robbie Sweeny; Dancers: Amelia Bovento, Katherine House

ABOUT

16 Electras began with Lewis’ research for the project My Obsession with Hamletmachine.  Seeing as Electra is a key character in Müller’s play, Lewis read all of the versions of the Electra myth that were written in or translated into English.  Though each version referenced is slightly different, one characteristic remains the same: Electra’s conviction and determination. She holds her her own truth, refuses to change her mind, and finds whatever way she can to take action.  Lewis took words or phrases from sixteen of these, listed below, to be used as song lyrics that dictates an extremely simplified version of the Electra myth.  Using many of Lewis’ original lyrics–some were cut–Agnes Szelag created six songs that outline Electra in her many phases: princess, outcast, mourner, coercer, murderess, and criminal.    Early on Lewis wanted to set 16 Electras in a public, outside space, which she believed symbolized and celebrated two ideas: 1) the original Electra, by Sophocles, is in the public domain and can be accessed by all, and 2) the power inherent in unwavering belief in oneself.  The San Francisco International Arts Festival offered several outside spaces to Lewis; she felt that the beauty and peace of the Black Point Battery site, along with its violent connotations (the  huge cannon in the center of the space), represented Electra perfectly.

Photo: Robbie Sweeny; Dancers: Amelia Bovento, Katherine House, Joyce Kushner, Daphne Zneimer

ARTISTS

Amelia Bonvento
Katherine House
Joyce Lien Kushner
Mary Katherine Patterson
Agnes Szelag
Daphne Zneimer

REFERENCES

1.  Aeschylus. Libation-bearers. Trans. Hugh Lloyd-Jones. Cambridge: Harvard
University Press, 1988.
2.  Alfaro, Luis. “Electricidad.” Trans. Helen E. Moritz. Text and Presentation. Ed. Stratos E. Constantinidis. Jefferson: McFarland & Company, Inc., 2007.
3.  Euripides. “Electra.” Trans. Elizabeth Wyckoff. The Complete Greek Tragedies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968.
4.  Galdós, Benito Pérez. Electra. Charleston: Bibliobazaar, 2008.
5.  Giraudoux, Jean. “Electra.” Trans. Phyllis La Sarge. Three Plays. New York: Hill and Wang, 1964.
6.  H.D. “A Dead Priestess Speaks”. Collected Poems, 1912-1944. New York: New Directions Books, 1983.
7.  Hofmannsthal, Hugo von. Elektra: Tragic Opera in One Act. Music by Richard Strauss. Trans. Charles T. Mason. London: Fürstner Limited, 1909.
8.  Kis, Danilo. “Elektra.” Trans. John K. Cox. Night and Fog: The Collected Dramas and Screenplays of Danilo Kis. Budapest: Helena History Press, 2014.
9.  Miller, Frank, Bill Sienkiewicz, Jim Novak, et al. Elektra Assassin. New York: Marvel Comics, 2000.
10.  O’Neill, Eugene. “Mourning Becomes Electra.” Three Plays. New York: Vintage Books, 1995.
11.  Plath, Sylvia. “Electra on Azalea Path”; “Daddy”. The Collected Poems. Cutchogue: Buccaneer Books, 196s0.
12.  Pound, Ezra and Rudd Fleming. Elektra. Ed. Richard Reid. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987.
13.  Ritsos, Yannis. The New Oresteia. Trans. George Pilitsis and Philip Pastras. New York: Pella Publishing Company, Inc.,
1991.
14.  Sartre, Jean-Paul. “The Flies.” Trans. I. Abel. No Exit and Three Other Plays. New York: Vintage International, 1989.
15.  Sophocles. Electra. Trans. Anne Carson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.
16.  Yourcenar, Marguerite. “Electra, or the Fall of the Masks.” Trans. Dori Katz. Plays. New York: Performing Arts Journal Publications, 1984.

SOMA NOW AND THEN

Photo: Robbie Sweeny; Dancer: Joe Landini

PREMIERED IN THE SOMA DISTRICT, SAN FRANCISCO, CA (2016)

CONCEPT/DIRECTION: 
Amy Lewis
ORIGINAL MOVEMENT/
PERFORMANCE:

Joe Landini
PROLOGUE/EPILOGUE:
Researched and written by Amy Lewis, read by Agnes Szelag
MAIN TEXT:
Compiled and edited from a 2015 interview with Joe Landini conducted by Amy lewis
FINAL SOUND EDITING:
Dan Wool
MUSIC:
“I’ll House You” by the Jungle Brothers, “I Can’t Forget” by Mr. Lee, “Like This” by Chip E., “You Use to Hold Me” by Ralphi Rosario, “Let’s Go” by Farley JackMaster Funk, “Respect” by Adeva, “Good Life” by Inner City. Mixed by DJ Chill X
SITES:
Powerhouse, gay bar and sex club; Brush Place and Hallam St., home to many gay men before the fire of 1981; Harriet St., close to 1015 Folsom which was a major bathhouse complex; Morris St., significant for freeway overpass, a landmark of SoMa since 1936; Blow Buddies, sex club

ABOUT

SOMA Now and Then was part of a body of work that explores how our psyche is effected by the rapid change we witness in our city. Throughout her life Lewis intends to explore San Francisco’s multifarious neighborhoods, creating performance pieces (each focused on a different area) that combine a walking tour with a dance piece.  Tread the Tendernob (2011), produced in conjunction with Meridian Gallery, was the first project of this kind that was created.

SOMA Now and Then consisted of one man’s journey through South of Market’s back alleys and secret rooms, as the neighborhood’s queer culture shifts from the heyday of leathermen into today’s tech boom. Through choreographed movement and personal anecdote, artist Joe Landini led audiences on a walking tour of the neighborhood, beginning at the SF Eagle at the corner of 12th and Harrison Streets, and finishing at Blow Buddies several blocks away.

Photo: Robbie Sweeny; Dancer: Joe Landini

ARTISTS

Joe Landini
Agnes Szelag

REFERENCES

Groth, Paul. Living Downtown: The History of Residential Hotels in the United States. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.
Hartman, Chester. City for Sale: The Transformation of San Francisco. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002.
Hittell, John Shertzer. A History of San Francisco and Incidentally of the State of California. San Francisco: A.L. Bancroft & Company, 1878.
Lipsky, William. Gay and Lesbian San Francisco. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2006.
Sides, Josh. Erotic City: Sexual Revolutions and the Making of Modern San Francisco. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.
Praetzellis, Mary and Adrian Praetzellis, eds. South of Market: Historical Archeology of 3 San Francisco Neighborhoods. California Department of Transportation. Sonoma: Anthropological Studies Center, 2009.
Gayle, Rubin. “Elegy for the Valley of the Kings: AIDS and the Leather Community in San Francisco, 1981-1996.” In Changing Times: Gay Men and Lesbians Encounter HIV/AIDS. Eds. Martin P. Levine, Peter M. Nardi, and John H. Gagnon. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997. 101-143.
—, “Leather’s Proust, in Pictures.” City of Wounded Boys & Sexual Warriors. Ed. Mark I. Chester. San Francisco: Mark I. Chester, 2015. 120-25.
—, “The Miracle Mile: South of Market and Gay Male Leather in San Francisco, 1962–1996.” Reclaiming San Francisco: History, Politics, Culture. Eds. James Brook, Chris Carlsson, and Nancy Peters. San Francisco: City LightsBooks, 1998. 247-72.
—, “Requiem for the Valley of the Kings,” Southern Oracle, Fall 1989.
—. “Sites, Settlements, and Urban Sex: Archaeology and the Study of Gay Leathermen in San Francisco 1955-1995.” Archaeologies of Sexuality. Eds. Robert Schmidt and Barbara Voss. London: Routledge, 2000. 62-88.
—,“The South of Market Leather History: A Short History and Walking Tour Guide.” San Francisco Frontiers, 20 Sept. 2001.

CONTEMPORARY-STYLE NAPOLEON DYNAMITE IN THE ROUND REPEATED

PREMIERED AT 8X8X8, THE UPTOWN, OAKLAND, CA (2016)

CHOREOGRAPHY:
Amy Lewis / Jon Heder
PERFORMANCE:
Amy Lewis
MUSIC:
Canned Heat by Jamiroquai

ABOUT

For paufve / dance‘s 8x8x8 10th Anniversary, Lewis created and performed a cover of the dance scene in Jared Hess’ hit movie Napoleon Dynamite.  8x8x8 is an evening of dance presented in a bar; Lewis chose to present a cover in response to the locale.  Contemporary-style Napoleon Dynamite in the Round Repeated also represents Lewis’ infatuation with re-framing objects that she loves.

SIX SUITES

PUSH SIX backgroundPREMIERED AT COMMUNITY MUSIC CENTER, SAN FRANCISCO, CA (2016)

Excerpts of Six Suites were shown at The Garage (2012, 2013), Dance Mission Theater (2013), The MilkBar (2014), and Mills College (2014)

Photo: Steven Warner; Dancer: Amy Lewis

Photo: Steven Warner; Dancer: Amy Lewis

MUSIC:
Six Suites for Unaccompanied Cello by J.S. Bach

Suite No. 1 in G major
Choreography and performance: Amy Lewis
Music performance: Jim Kassis
Costume: Melissa Castaneda

Suite No. 2 in D minor

Choreography and performance: Sonsherée Giles
Music performance: Eli Wise
Costume design: Sonsherée Giles

Photo: Carly McLane; Dancer: Sonsherée Giles

Suite No. 3 in C major
Dance: Shinichi Iova-Koga
Music: Suki O’Kane
Costumes: Shinichi Iova-Koga
Props: Suki O’Kane

Suite No. 4 in Eb major
Choreography, performance, and costumes: Janet Collard
Sarabande: performance by Janet Collard and Shinichi Iova-Koga
Music performance: Alex Keitel

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Photo: Liam Passmore; Dancer: Shinichi Iova-Koga

Suite No. 5 in C minor
Prélude: choreography and performance by Christy Funsch and Peiling Kao
Allemande: choreography and performance by Christy Funsch
Courante: choreography and performance by Peiling Kao
Sarabande: choreography by Christy Funsch; performance by Peiling Kao
Gavotte: choreography by Peiling Kao; performance by Christy Funsch
Gigue: choreography and performance by Christy Funsch and Peiling Kao
Music performance: Crystal Pascucci

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Photo: still from footage shot by Loren Robertson Productions; Dancers: Janet Collard and Shinichi Iova-Koga

Suite No. 6 in D major
Prélude: choreography and performance by Shinichi Iova-Koga
Allemande: choreography by Amy Lewis in collaboration with Sebastian Grubb; performance by Sebastian Grubb
Courante: choreography and performance by Janet Collard and Sonsherée Giles
Sarabande: choreography and performance by Christy Funsch
Gavotte: choreography and performance by Peiling Kao
Gigue: improvisation from a score created by Sonsherée Giles; performance by Collard, Funsch, Giles, Iova-Koga, Kao, and Lewis.
Music performance: Katrina Wreede

Six Suites Dress Rehersal (660 of 293)

Photo: Lynne Fried; Dancers: Christy Funsch, Peiling Kao

ABOUT

Curated by Amy Lewis, Six Suites  presented six unique dance works to Six Suites for Unaccompanied Cello by J.S. Bach.  The artists involved worked separately on their own individual suite with complete autonomy.  Approach, choreography, instrumentation, and musician was chosen by each artist without input from Lewis.  Six Suites rallied the Bay Area dance community around a specific subject, that is, the examination of choreographers’ continual fascination with Bach, and the possibility of relating contemporary interests to a codified, iconic, and much-loved score. Part of the goal of the project was to address Lewis’ interest in collective impact, in what happens when several artists tackle the same issue.  Alternately, just as P.U.S.H.’s historical work asks the viewer to look at several different ways of living life, Six Suites asks the viewer to witness six different ways of working with Bach.

ARTISTS

Melissa Castaneda
Janet Marie Collard
Sonsherée Giles
Sebastian Grubb
Christy Funsch
Shinichi Iova-Koga
Peiling Kao
Jim Kassis
Alex Keitel
Suki O’Kane
Crystal Pascucci
Eli Wise
Katrina Wreede

AN AGGREGATE OF SUBSTANCE

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

PREMIERED AT OFF-SITE, EAST BAY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, RICHMOND, CA (2016)

CHOREOGRAPHY:
Amy Lewis
DANCERS:
Destiny Dyas, Bobbi Finkelstein, Lucy Flexer-Marshall, Nina Gonzalez Silas, Lucy McLeod, Anika Whetstone
MUSIC:
Drumming (Four Tet Remix): Steve Reich – Remixed

ABOUT

Created for Shawl Anderson Dance Center’s Youth Ensemble, An Aggregate of Substance played with embodying Goffried Wilhelm Leibniz’s concept of the monad, a corporeal substance made up of the primitive soul and primary matter.  To gather further information for sequencing the piece, Lewis looked into monads as they are used in functional programming.

STEALING FROM GURDJIEFF

PREMIERED AT WEST WAVE DANCE FESTIVAL, Z SPACE, SAN FRANCISCO, CA (2015)

Georges Ivanovitch Gurdjieff

CHOREOGRAPHY: 
Amy Lewis in collaboration with the dancers
MUSIC:
All music composed by Georges I. Gurdjieff
“No. 40 From “Asian Songs and Rhythms” played by The Gurdjieff Folk Instruments Ensemble
“Trinity” played by The Gurdjieff Folk Instruments Ensemble
“Atarnakh, Kurd Song” played by Elan Sicroff
“Moorish Dance” played by Elan Sicroff
DANCERS: 
Sonsherée Giles, Sebastian Grubb
COSTUMES:
Sonsherée Giles

Photo: Chris Mentzel; Dancers: Giles, Grubb

ABOUT

The idea for Stealing from Gurdjief stemmed from Lewis’ research–conducted for the project My Obsession with Hamletmachine–on his work and influence on the education program at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin Fellowship.  Stealing from Gurdjieff uses as a template an illustration of poses from Gurdjieff’s Movements. The work raised questions of ownership while exploring intimacy within strict boundaries.

ARTISTS

Sonsherée Giles
Sebastian Grubb

TREAD THE TENDERNOB

WALKING TOUR FROM THE MERIDIAN GALLERY TO THE CLIFT HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CA (2011)


CONCEPT, DIRECTION, TEXT:

Amy Lewis
ART DIRECTION:
Emily Manthei
PERFORMERS:
Michael Aari, Rodney Bell, Blaine Bookey, Kelly Defayette, Sonsherée Giles, lola a. katie, Maureen Keleher, Linda Landeros, Shannon Leypoldt, Kevin Mosley, Sierra Murphree, Joy Prendergast, Mark Randal

ABOUT

As part of Meridian Gallery’s 100th anniversary celebration, choreographer Amy Lewis conducted a performed walking tour–exploring shelter, sin, and spirituality–from the gallery to the Clift Hotel, with a brief saunter through the Tenderloin.  Michelle Lynch, dance curator at Meridian Gallery, requested the creation of a walking tour for House at 100, an arts festival celebrating the centennial birthday of the gallery’s home. The tour passed through both Nob Hill, where the gallery is located, and the Tenderloin, in an effort to capture the economic and cultural difference between the two neighborhoods.  This project involved a significant amount of research, mainly  on the history of the luxury hotels on California St. and the Big Four, the SRO hotels in the Tenderloin, San Francisco city policy on massage parlors, and three churches: Grace Cathedral, the Fifth Church of Christ Scientist, and Glide.  Most of the figures Lewis discussed during the tour were people who had died some time ago, including Lewis’ Grandmother, who passed away in the Clift Hotel.  To tie in the theme of the dead, Lewis asked some of the  performers to play ghosts, which worked well with a tour given the day before Halloween.

Lewis’ grandmother who died in the Clift Hotel.

Tenderloin ghosts; Performers: Bell, Giles

 

Ghost brides; Performers: Leypoldt, Prendergast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTISTS

Michael Aari
Rodney Bell
Blaine Bookey
Kelly Defayette
Sonsherée Giles
lola a. Katie
Maureen Keleher
Linda Landeros
Shannon Leypoldt
Kevin Mosley
Sierra Murphree
Joy Prendergast
Mark Randal

REFERENCES

Brook, James, Chris Carlsson, Nancy J. Peters, Ed. Reclaiming San Francisco: History, Politics, Culture.San   Francisco: City Lights Books, 1998.
Cadillac Hotel. Oct 2011. http://cadillachotel.org
Cohen, Katherine Powell. San Francisco’s Nob Hill. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.
Foundsf. Oct. 2011. http://foundsf.org
Greendoor Massage. Oct. 2011. http://441stocktonadpr.net
Grenville, Bruce. “Renovating History: The Evolution of the Clift (Part Two).” July 4, 2011. Grand Hotel.   Vancouver Art Gallery. Oct. 2011 http://projects.vanartgallery.bc.ca/publications/Hotel/renovating-history-the-evolution-of-the-clift-part-two/
Groth, Paul. Living Downtown: The History of Residential Hotels in the United States. Berkeley: University   of California Press, 1994.
Howie, Kent. “Psycho: Portraits of SRO Doorways in San Francisco’s Tenderloin.” ATA Webzine, Issue #5.   ATAsite. Ed. Kathleen Guillian. 2006 Artists’ Television Access. Oct 2011.http://atasite.org/zine/issue5/psycho.htmlLipsky, William. San Francisco’s Panama-Pacific International Exposition. Arcadia Publishing, 2005.
Minkler, Meredith. Community Organizing and Community Building for Health. Rutgers: The State   University of New Jersey, 2005.
Nash, Suzanne, Ed. Home and its Dislocations in Nineteenth Century France. Albany: State University of   New York Press, 1993.
Olmstead, Roger R., Tom H. Watkins, Junior League of San Francisco. Here today: San Francisco’s   Architectural Heritage. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1968.
Richards, Rand. Historic San Francisco: A Concise History and Guide. San Francisco: Heritage House   Publishers, 2007.
“San Francisco Homeless Resource.” Wikia. Oct. 2011.http://sfhomeless.wikia.com/wiki/Category:SRO_Hotels
Sharonkramlich.com. Ed. Sharon Robinson-Kramlich. 2000. Oct. 2011.http://sharonkramlich.com/sfinfo/architecture/
Tenderloin Architecture. DeVault, Talia, Kyle Lester, Dana Shaw, producers. Tenderloin Housing Clinic,   2009. Oct. 2011. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLQlFY4bg4I
Up From The Deep. Ed. Mark Ellinger. 2004-2012. Oct 2011. http://upfromthedeep.com
Uptown Tenderloin Historic District. 2011, Uptown Tenderloin, Inc. Oct. 2011. http://uptowntl.org

THE WAITING NAMELESS

PREMIERED AT ODC COMMONS, STUDIO B, SAN FRANCISCO, CA (2011)

Photo: Mark Andrew Wilson; Dancers: Damasco, Lewis

CHOREOGRAPHY:
Leandro Glory Damasco Jr., Amy Lewis
DANCERS:
Leandro Glory Damasco Jr., Amy Lewis
MUSIC:
Bill Wolter

ABOUT

Created as part of ODC’s Pilot Program, The Waiting Nameless was yet another study using dance maps (for information on dance maps, see Cartography of a Synchronous Telemtrist).  Lewis considers all pieces made from dance maps to be part of a larger, ongoing work that is derived from choreographic systems created from an analyzation of Bill Wolter’s music paired with information on Honoré de Balzac, nineteenth century author of The Human Comedy.

ARTISTS

Bill Wolter
Leandro Glory Damasco Jr.

BALLS TO BALZAC: A JOURNEY FROM TESTICLES TO WOMEN IN THE BOURBON RESTORATION

PREMIERED AT CELLSPACE, SAN FRANCISCO, CA (2010)

CHOREOGRAPHY, TEXT, AND PERFORMANCE:
Amy Lewis

ABOUT

Balls to Balzac began by connecting Lewis’ conversations with composer Bill Wolter to the life of Honoré de Balzac, author of The Human Comedy  Relating these two figures led to a performance art dancelecture on the use of “balls” as slang, the term’s relationship to Honoré de Balzac, and Balzac’s portrayal of 19th century society women.  Wolter’s use of the phrase “balls deep”, and the way in which this phrase relates to Balzac (called “balls-ache” by nineteenth century students) became the basis of their connection, though they are also tied together by their mutual belief that consumerism causes societal disruption.  For Balzac, consumerism meant the increase of his reading public, and therefore his income, yet it also signified the fluidity of class boundaries and the dislocation and chaos that went along with rapidly changing social structures.  Wolter agrees with some of the theories presented by Charles Eisenstein:  “The commoditization of social relationships leaves us with nothing to do together but to consume.  Joint consumption does nothing  to build community because it requires no gifts….Consumption calls upon no one’s gifts, calls forth none of anyone’s true being. Community and intimacy cannot come from joint consumption, but only from giving and co-creativity.” (Sacred Economics: Money, Gift, and Society in the Age of Transition, 78)

 

Photo: Sierra Murphree; Performer: Amy Lewis

 

 

 

 

 

 

REFERENCES

Allan, Keith and Kate Burridge. Euphemism & Dysphemism: Language Used as          Shield and Weapon. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.
Balzac, Honoré de. Beatrix. Trans. George Burnham Ives. Philadelphia: George
Barrie & Son, c1897.
—.The Correspondence of Honoré de Balzac. Trans. C. Lamb Kenney. Vol.
1. London: R. Bentley, 1878.
—. A Harlot High and Low. Trans. Rayner Heppenstall. London: Penguin
Books, 1970.
—. The Letters of Honoré de Balzac to Madame Hanska. Trans. Katharine
Prescott Wormeley. Boston:     Little, Brown, and Company, 1900.
—. The Lily of the Valley. Trans. Katharine Prescott Wormeley. Boston:
Roberts Brothers, 1891.
—. The Wild Ass’s Skin. Trans. Herbert J. Hunt. London: Penguin Books,
1977.
—. A Woman of Thirty. Ed. George Saintsbury. Trans. Ellen Marriage.
London: J.M. Dent and Co., 1897.
Butler, Ronnie. Balzac and the French Revolution. London: Barnes &
Noble Books, 1983 .
Calle, Mireille, ed. On the Feminine. Trans. Catherine McGann. New
Jersey: Humanities Press, 1996.
“Creedence Lyrics: Lodi.” Creedence Online.
http://www.creedence-online.net/lyrics/lodi.php.
Floyd, Juanita Helm. Women in the Life of Balzac. New York: H. Holt and
Company, 1921.
Jameson, Fredric. Marxism and Form: Twentieth-century Dialectical
Theories of Literature
. New Jersey:     Princeton University Press,
c1971.
Jay, Timothy. Why We Curse: A Neuro-Psycho-Social Theory of Speech.
Philadelphia: J. Benjamins, c2000.
Kanes, Martin, comp. Critical Essays on Honoré de Balzac. Boston: G.K.
Hall & Co., 1990. Marceau, Felicien. Balzac and His World. Trans.
Derek Coltman. New York: The Onion Press, 1966.
“Medicinal Fried Chicken.” South Park. Season 14. Comedy Central,
New York. 31 Mar. 2010.
Partridge, Eric. A Concise Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English.
New York: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1990.
Partridge, Eric. A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English. Ed. Paul
Beale. 8th Ed. New York:     Macmillan Publishing Company,
1984.
Partridge, Eric. Slang Today and Yesterday. New York: Macmillan
Publishing Company, 1934.
Prendergast, Christopher. Balzac: Fiction and Melodrama. London:
Edward Arnold Ltd, 1978.
Proust, Marcel. By Way of Sainte-Beuve. Trans. Sylvia Townsend Warner.
London: Hogarth, 1984.
Reinach, Jacquelyn. Nuts to Nightingale. Illus. Richard Hefter. New York:
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1978.

CARTOGRAPHY OF THE SYNCHRONOUS TELEMTRIST

PREMIERED AT COMMUNITY MUSIC CENTER, SAN FRANCISCO, CA (2009)


CHOREOGRAPHY:
Amy Lewis in collaboration with the dancers
MUSIC:
Bill Wolter
DANCERS:
Holly Furgason, Sonsherée Giles, Emily Gorman, Becca Henderson, Julia Hollas, Kaitlin Parks, Emmaly Wiederholt
MUSICIANS:
Nick Culp, Shayna Dunkelman, Melody Ferris, Jordan Glenn, Ivor Holloway, Curtis McKinney, Charith Premawardhana, Max Stoffregen, Bill Wolter
COSTUMES:
Sonsherée Giles
GRAPHIC DESIGN:
Holly Furgason

telemtrist (tə-lĕm’ĭ-trĭst)
1. n. a protector of the earth
2. n. someone who translates concepts into human expression
3. n. someone who tells things to two or more people, usually about dreams

ABOUT

Choreographer Amy Lewis and composer Bill Wolter presented the fruits of a year-long collaborative process, including their misunderstandings and disagreements, to a performance involving the disparate and contradictory ideas of mapping, astral projection, and synchronicity.  While Lewis used compositions and conversations by and with Wolter as the basis for a mapping system, addressing the limitations of both the body and language as avenues for communication, Wolter explored altered states of being, through music, a Neanderthal, and an obscure game entitled Bro-Ball.  To generate the movement for Cartography, Lewis first made dance maps, based on a made-up system using several of Wolter’s compositions as a guide. For instance, if the music was in the key of E Major, the head would be chosen any time an E sounded, arms for an F, torso for G, etc. If the key modulated to B Major, the head would stand for a B, arms for a C, etc. Right and left side patterns were built according to the meter–4/4 became right, left, right, left; 3/4 right, left, left, right; 6/8 left, right, left, left, right, left, right, right.  Lewis added joint action, a dynamics line, and holds.  Each map (4 in all) were created with information from a previous map, as well as new information.

Photo: lola a. katie; Dancer: Sonsherée Giles

ARTISTS

Bill Wolter 
Holly Furgason
Sonsherée Giles
Becca Henderson
Julia Hollas
Katilin Parks
Emmaly Wiederholt
Nick Culp
Shayna Dunkelman
Melody Ferris
Jordan Glenn
Ivor Holloway
Curtis McKinney
Charith Premawardhana
Max Stoffregen

DANCE MAPS

Click the links below to see the dance maps

Map Legend

Solo 1
Solo 1, Page 1
Solo 1, Page 2

Solo 2
Solo 2, Page 1
Solo 2, Page 2

Duet
Duet, Page 1
Duet, Page 2
Duet, Page 3
Duet, Page 4

Quartet
Quartet, Page 1
Quartet, Page 2
Quartet, Page 3
Quartet, Page 4
Quartet, Page 5
Quartet, Page 6
Quartet, Page 7
Quartet, Page 8
Quartet, Page 9

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